More things to do

Griffith Observatory
A group of conference attendees are planning a visit to the Griffith Observatory on Thursday evening. The grounds and museum have free admission and are open until 10pm. On clear nights (most nights in LA in the summer) the rangers set up telescopes on the lawn and also allow people to look through the bigger telescope in the building.  The planetarium has a show on the Northern Lights at 7:45 for $7 ( purchase tickets at the observatory). We encourage you to share rides.

Warner Brothers Studio
Warner Brothers Studio, a short drive away in nearby Burbank, is the studio where Elizabeth von Arnim’s Mr. Skeffington, starring Bette Davis and Claude Rains, was filmed in of the Bette Davis and Claude Rains. A wonderful part of Los Angeles history, Still a working studio, Warner Brothers offers 3-4 hour tours timed to depart every half hour. Tickets are $65 a person.

The Hollywood Bowl
Summer home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Hollywood Bowl is a beautiful place on a warm July evening. Reasonably-priced tickets are still available for conductor Gustavo Dudamel’s program on Tuesday, July 18 featuring Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man” and “Lincoln: A Portrait” as well as Ludwig Van Beethoven’s 9th Symphony. Tickets range from $8 upwards depending on your choice of seating.

The Norton Simon Museum
Featuring a number of modernist works in their collection, the Norton Simon Museum has a new exhibit on Galka Scheyer, the “Maven of California Modernism,” dedicated to the woman art dealer who became important to the modernist art world, particularly in California.

The Pasadena Museum of California Art
The PCMA is featuring a show this summer called “The Golden Twenties: Portraits and Figure Paintings by Joseph Kleitsch.”  Kleitsch painted modernist/impressionist Plein Air works of Southern California and was a founder of the Laguna art colony. Also on display is an exhibit entitled  “Gustave Baumann in California,” which features color woodcuts inspired by the artists’ trips to California between 1927 and 1940.

Gamble House in Pasadena
Pasadena has a reputation for its early- and mid-twentieth architecture; the city’s “Bungalow Heaven” neighborhood includes more than 800 craftsman style homes built between 1900-1930. Designed by architects Greene and Greene in 1908, Gamble House is a stellar example of American Arts and Crafts architecture. It was restored by University of Southern California, and the house offers short inexpensive tours on Tuesday the 18th at lunchtime, allowing tour-goers to eat lunch on their patio.  The Huntington Library also has a related exhibit of Greene and Greene arts and crafts furniture.

San Gabriel Mission
Pasadena traces its colonial roots to the founding of San Gabriel Mission in 1771 by Franciscan priests to convert the Tongva Indians (later called the Gabrielenos). The oldest part of Los Angeles, San Gabriel continues today as a working Catholic Church and school. Visitors may tour the mission, which has a collection of historic objects, including a series of 14 paintings of the Stations of the Cross considered one of the finest examples of early Native Californian religious art, and a hammered copper baptismal font, a gift of King Carlos of Spain in 1771. Admission to the Mission Museum is $6 for adults. Hours Mon-Sat 9- 4:30 and Sun 10-4.

Further Information

The Pasadena Convention and Visitors Bureau has excellent information to help visitors make plans:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *